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As I finish grading the last of my Music Theory 101 assignments from the Fall 2008 term, I’m reminded of something John Mayer said to the Berklee College of Music undergrads at a recent clinic he conducted.

“The reason that you learn [music theory] is you’re taking something that began as impulse or sentiment, something very impalpable, and are learning to turn that into musical information, so that it can travel from person to person…take that math and turn it into color as fast as you possibly can.”

For those who apply themselves, Berkleemusic’s Music Theory 101 online course actually takes students from learning basic note names and rhythms to voice leading seventh chord inversions, creating accompaniments, and writing melodies… all in the span of just 12 weeks. The course is nothing short of incredible.

Every time I teach a section of Music Theory 101 online, I’m in awe of the solid music theory foundation the students build, and how quickly they are able to use their new tools to create art. That foundation will continue to serve them in all of their musical pursuits for many years to come.

Berkleemusic’s Music Theory 101, authored by Chair Emeritus Paul Schmeling, is a proven path to turning your inspiration into art with pragmatic tools of the trade. Check out a sample lesson to learn more.

sample

As they saying goes, a picture is worth a thousand words! The same is true for distance learning. It can take a lot of words to describe what a simple look “under the hood” will readily convey. Enter Berkleemusic Sample courses!

There are four sample courses currently available including Guitar Scales, Concert Touring, Music Theory 101, and Orchestration, and more coming soon.

To access Berkleemusic’s sample courses, click here.

vault
Uploaded with plasq‘s Skitch!

Wolfgang’s Vault is an incredible resource of concert recordings from every artist you can imagine (seriously). It’s a treasure trove of recordings that can be streamed and shared in many elegant ways. I highly recommend this resource!

My post today, is dedicated to my Fall 2008 online Music Theory class.
Shout Out to Section 8!

They are doing a great job learning about rhythms and time signatures in this, the second week of Music Theory 101 online.

I thought it would be fun to find concert recordings with songs that represent some of the time signatures they are studying. There are lots of examples in 4/4 time, a common meter in rock music. But, there are also some more obscure time signatures present throughout the Vault’s recordings. Here is one of the most famous songs in 7/4 time, “Money” by Pink Floyd.

What other interesting time signatures can you find in the concert recordings of Wolfgang’s Vault? Anyone? Anyone? ; ) Please post them here.

vault
Uploaded with plasq‘s Skitch!

Wolfgang’s Vault is an incredible resource of concert recordings from every artist you can imagine (seriously). It’s a treasure trove of recordings that can be streamed and shared in many elegant ways. I highly recommend this resource!

My post today, is dedicated to my Fall 2008 online Music Theory class.
Shout Out to Section 8!

They are doing a great job learning about rhythms and time signatures in this, the second week of Music Theory 101 online.

I thought it would be fun to find concert recordings with songs that represent some of the time signatures they are studying. There are lots of examples in 4/4 time, a common meter in rock music. But, there are also some more obscure time signatures present throughout the Vault’s recordings. Here is one of the most famous songs in 7/4 time, “Money” by Pink Floyd.

What other interesting time signatures can you find in the concert recordings of Wolfgang’s Vault? Anyone? Anyone? ; ) Please post them here.